Alexandra Helmig is talking to…


Daniel Man | Artist

1. What do you need to be creative and what inspires you?
Environment creates the space in which creativity is born. I become an observer. So pretty much anything inspires… music or a background radio interview. The art books on the shelf… the incident light etc. Or the inspiration in the city: the mood of the people, the urban space. The interaction of everything. You could say the pulsation of the city.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
Ohh. Tough question. There are so many good artists from so many different eras. Not aiming for the absolute present, I would have said Beuys! But it’s not so much what he produced as art, but rather in what holistic attitude art was embedded. Very exciting. The last exhibition that caused me an enormous echo is the “Weltempfänger” exhibition in the Lenbachhaus. Three female artists towards the end of the
19th century. Good art that is also dedicated to the spiritual. Georgiana Houghton’s sensitive drawings are not from this world!

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Art has no boundaries – it keeps the playfulness and freedom in children. It is what children naturally have at this stage. The encounter with art opens up new play areas, different perspectives, gives impulses for new things. In any kind of art, children can be completely absorbed, completely devoted.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
When I was eleven, I had the idea that one day I would become a car designer. In any case, I always wanted to take a creative direction. A few years later I wanted to go to Disney and become an animator.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
Profession? I see it more as a vocation. What’s special about it is the freedom to create. There are indeed external influences, for example trends, that suggest what you should do, but on the whole nobody tells you what to do. But after all, that is the crux of art. I alone should decide what kind of art I make? Observer role: In art I am allowed to observe and depict. Creator role: I have an idea and I am allowed to realize it from the beginning to the end. Like Master Geppetto with his Pinocchio. Even though art as a profession falls outside of all other professions, I think it has a great responsibility.
Besides, the therapeutic approach of personal development and processing is not to be sneezed at…

More information about Daniel Man here.

On 21.10.2019 a new series of events was opened at the Kinderkunsthaus with the “Workshop Vernissage” by the artist Daniel Man. The event also marked the end of the “Workshop Talks” series, which in 2019 was under the motto “Creativity”. Specifically for this theme series, Daniel Man created his latest work of art entitled “A Leap into the Void”, which he presented exclusively in our workshop. Daniel Man also provided insights into his art, his career and his work. His creativity is impressively reflected in his work, abstraction meets figuration, text meets image, traditional craftsmanship meets StreetArt. His works – mostly room-related installations – show the diversity of his oeuvre and can be seen in large museums and galleries, including in Bremen, Wuppertal, Hamburg, Leipzig, the Lenbachhaus in Munich and now also in the Kinderkunsthaus. The artwork “Ein Sprung ins Leere” hangs in our entrance area and can be viewed during the regular opening hours of the Open Program (Tue to Fri 14 – 18 h, Sat/Sun 10 – 18 h). On Wed, 26.2.2020, we offer the holiday workshop “Layer by layer – we discover Daniel Man” for 6 to 10 year olds, in which we deal with the work and stylistic devices of the Munich artist.


 
Rudi Hurzlmeier alias Hu | Hirameki-Artist

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
For creative ideas I just need some clouds and a little wind. At the moment I am especially inspired by insects.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
There are a lot of them – and of course I admire them all for their artistry.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Because you can make wonderful art at a very early age. You can make wonderful pancakes later.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
I think I always wanted to be an artist – at least not a baker.

5. What is special about your profession, and what do you like best about it?
You can always do things you thought up yourself. And nobody is allowed to talk you into it.

More information about Rudi Hurzlmeier here.


 
Timo Becker | Illustrator

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
Depending on the direction in which the form of creativity should go, very different music can help me. Or total silence. What is important for me in any case is a pen in my hand. Even if I don’t develop anything visual, the design of simple forms helps me in the creative thinking process. Inspiration comes from the world around me when I am able to look at it properly. But this is a pretty big issue.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
To be honest, I don’t have a favourite artist and I don’t really care much about art.
There are a lot of illustrators and designers who have fascinated and influenced me. Just to name a few: Janosch, Sven Nordqvist, Shaun Tan, Edouard Guiton. But my thinking was completely revolutionized by Steve Jobs.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
I believe that almost every child enjoys creating. At least until someone disparages the result. For me, drawing has always been a great hobby and I think that only through everyday drawing in a sketchbook have I learned to really perceive my surroundings. Felix Scheinberger has inspired me a lot to use the sketch as a mental note.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
A natural scientist! I was totally fascinated by nature and its inhabitants, and I wanted to spend my life in some steppes and primeval forests. The question whether I wanted to become a comic artist was rather annoying. Making drawing my profession seemed utopian to me, and until the end of my school days I considered drawing as a pure hobby.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
I can create things that I like myself or would have liked to have as a child. That is something very special. Through my independence, I can also constantly re-filter which projects I really want to work on and, above all, try out completely new fields, such as game development. 

More information about Timo Becker


 
Moritz Welker | Designer

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
Inspiration is everywhere. Most inspiration and the best ideas come with free time – doing nothing, drinking coffee, going for a walk – so you have enough time to think the thoughts that might lead you in the right direction.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
I have now seriously had a week to think about it, … I have come up with many who create great things and whom I admire, but to choose a “darling” from all these people would be wrong. What they all have in common is that they are people who follow a strong conviction and shape their environment with a consistency in all areas and leave a distinctive mark everywhere.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Every form of art is an expression, therefore also somehow a language, which we as human beings must never forget. The earlier we deal with all the media surrounding us, the better we can express ourselves in them and tell others what we think and feel.
I think that hardly any language offers the possibility of expressing itself in the way that art can.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
Oh… haha, I was very volatile. From astronauts to nurses to Batman, everything was here.

5. What’s so special about your profession, and what do you like best about it?
I think the golden cage of self-determination is special. As a freelance designer, you have to learn to juggle between duty and freestyle.
But it’s the constant alternation between pure service and artistic romp on personal projects that’s the beauty of it. Hardly any other profession offers this degree of freedom.

Photo: Felix Wichert

More information about Moritz Welker


 
Anemone Kloos | Illustrator

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
The world around me inspires me. Also music and literature, adventure, dreaming and doing nothing. But most of all the changing colours of the seasons.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
I am a great admirer of the French illustrator Rébecca Dautremer. I can be enthusiastic about Klimt and the formal language of van Gogh, about Dima Rebus but also about great street artists like BEZT and SAINER.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Art offers a wonderful opportunity to express oneself and to show others, at least to some extent, how one sees the world or how one would like to see it. The beautiful thing about art is that everything is possible.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
I actually always wanted to make drawing my profession, even if I didn’t have a term for it at that time. And I think I remember when I was very small I wanted to become Madonna. How good that didn’t work out.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
I like the freedom and the freedom of independence best and the constant change. I love telling stories in pictures and giving my characters a face, a spirit and a personality. I often fever with them, laugh or marvel with my protagonists until their story is told. Then I invent new people and new worlds.

More information about Anemone Kloos


 
Stefan Wilkening | Speaker | Actor | Patron of Kinderkunsthaus

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
A good text, a good play that stimulates my imagination. Then pictures arise in my head and I try to transport them to the outside. I find it inspiring to be allowed to observe people at any time and any occasion and in all kinds of places.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
Sir Peter Ustinov, unfortunately already dead. On the one hand, because he was one of the last universal geniuses (writer, composer, entertainer, documentary filmmaker, director, actor), on the other hand, because he preserved his childhood as an actor. With him, the sentence is really true: he put his childhood in his pocket and ran off.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
I have the feeling that children today are under a performance and deadline pressure very early on. Art, on the other hand, offers a wonderful freedom: simply expressing themselves – without pressure of expectation, in whatever form. That is art in the best and most childlike sense.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
First a pop singer, then a pastor with the goal of becoming pope :-), later a conductor (today it’s called train attendant) and then a sports reporter. Finally I became an actor – which is logical.

5. What is special about your profession, and what do you like best about it?
The special thing is that I can dive into other worlds and take others (the audience) with me. The most beautiful thing is that I can make people happy with my profession.

More information about Stefan Wilkening


 
Lea Grebe | Painter | Goldsmith | Art educator
1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
Music, silence, time – and my favourite brushes and colours.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
This question can hardly be answered with a clear answer. There are always new and different artists who keep me busy and interested at times. At the moment, for example, Wolfgang Laib, who with his delicate works of pollen thematically borders on my occupation with insects and creates incredibly fascinating works with the natural material.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Art gives children the opportunity to make new experiences, to try things out and to handle their means in a light-hearted way – to immerse themselves completely in colour and material. It corresponds to the naturally given urge to express and communicate, promotes creativity and flexibility in dealing with the most diverse things that are constantly demanded of one in everyday life. Is a shelter and a place of retreat.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
A greengrocer – probably because I always liked to play with my shop.

5. What is special about your job and what do you like best about it?
Everything. It’s exactly what I want to do for the rest of my life.


 
Julia Schneider | Interior Architect
1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
I am inspired by experiences, travel, nature, exhibitions, art, music, theatre, happenings and friends. I love to be creative with friends.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner occupied me already as a teenager. My interest was influenced by my art teacher, whom I adore very much, and by my passion, skiing in Switzerland. After ski tours in Davos I always come to Stafelalp above Frauenkirch near Davos. Ernst Ludwig Kircher also lived here before his death. His work in Davos is impressive and can be viewed in the Kirchner Museum in Davos-Platz, which is also architecturally valuable.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Art shows children that it can be important and life-fulfilling to express themselves. Both in the visual arts on paper, canvas, wood and stone and on the theatre stage or with an instrument.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
I loved to read aloud and wanted to be a newsreader.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
Inspiration, drawing, realization. My profession as an interior designer is so beautiful because I create objects and rooms every day. The most beautiful thing is to take the first sketch after a project is finished and to follow the design process.


 
Kirsten Scholz | Architect

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you? Absolute tranquillity and many examples of associations, which I filter out of the most diverse creative areas…art, photography, theatre, films, music and good architecture of course. Traveling, getting to know new places, people and cultures … I get inspired by every single journey, even if it is only small.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
Julius Shulmann, Klaus Kinold and how these two show exciting perspectives of architecture in photography.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Art shows them that there are different perspectives on the same things. It trains their own eye, so they can learn to see RIGHT. You can see differences in brushstrokes, for example. One becomes sensitized for the detail. Art can relax, excite, inspire, touch etc.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
Photographer or camerawoman.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
I try to tailor a spatial suit to the needs of the client. This means that I have to listen carefully and try to translate the images that arise in the client’s mind through personal impressions and emotions into architecture. If I manage to do this to some extent, if my architecture creates the atmosphere that is presented and reflects the images, then that is a great feeling.


 
IRMA alias Jasmin Khezri | Illustrator
1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
Space, light and lots of fresh air. People & places inspire me.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
Luc Tuymans, because I am fascinated by his colours, the paleness and the light in his paintings.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
So that they remain children forever, remember a wonderful time and don’t put aside the lightness so quickly. Art is the key to being able to let go and move on.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
A star.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
That my tasks and challenges are always changing. I always reinvent myself through my drawn, virtual character IRMA. Sometimes she is the way I would like to be, be or will be.


 
Andreas Klostermaier | Software-Developer

1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
To be creative I need music by J.S.Bach, a white sheet of paper, a pencil and time. For me, ideas for software projects are first created on paper and lack of time is the biggest creative obstacle for me. I get inspired by everything: a book, a quote I’ve picked up or a look out the window. My last inspiration was this morning when I was taking apart and looking at a wooden camembert packaging.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
I don’t have a favourite artist – the subject of art is too broad for that and the number of artists I admire is too large. But I could emphasize Mark Lombardi: his reduced way of visualizing social or political connections typographically until they manifest themselves in fascinating patterns and thus become art, comes very close to my own perception of reality.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Children today grow up in a hyper-rationalized society. The concentration on reason, achievement and efficiency begins in primary school. Even physical experience (as in sports) is now subject to measurement technology through apps and contact with nature is reduced to a minimum. Perhaps art (besides religion) is the last chance for children to experience those substantial and sensual traits of human existence that are not subject to obey rationality. This may sound strange from the mouth of a programmer, but software development can be as creative and irrational as creating a painting or a piece of music!

4. What did you want to become as a child?
Egyptologist! And if that didn’t work out, then Egyptologist, or alternatively Egyptologist. If necessary, an archaeologist or palaeontologist would have done it (so in any case something with “ä”). But then I finally became a typesetter.

5. What is special about your profession, and what do you like best about it?
As a programmer you have to break down complex issues into simple steps – you are forced to get to the bottom of things instead of just accepting them. This gives you a deep insight into the nature of things and the feeling that you can change something at the root. This is extremely fascinating and is what makes my job so special. In addition, the abstract technique of programming can be applied to all kinds of subjects – this is how I was able to combine the love for my teaching profession (typesetter) and the love for computers in my job by specializing in software solutions in the graphic arts industry.


 
Lola Paltinger | Traditional costume designer
1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
In any case, I need a certain inner and outer balance, my family, art, nature- actually things that fulfill me, but which are not necessarily only related to fashion. Often the best ideas come to me when I am relaxed and busy with completely different things, i.e. fashion. But even under pressure, good ideas often emerge.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
I like artists with a background, whose life is reflected in their work. For example, I am very impressed by the life and work of Frida Kahlo. But also contemporary artists, like Neo Rauch, whose pictures tell stories and are so versatile.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Children should be introduced to art with ease. In my opinion, this can be at a really tender age. Art is enriching and can greatly encourage creativity, which is also important in everyday life. I think it’s important not to over-analyze individual works with children, but simply to let the art work.

4. What did you want to become as a child?
With me it always went in the direction of a vet or tap dancer, also funny when you think about it today.

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
On the one hand, I can really let my hair down with my couture collections, but on the other hand I also work in a very customer-oriented way, for example in the teleshopping area. Diversity demands enormous flexibility and new challenges, you always grow with your tasks.


 
Judith Milberg | Designer, Art historian
1. What do you need to be creative? And what inspires you?
Actually I only need one special room: my workshop. For me, it is a spiritual retreat and creative stimulus, it means peace and activity and is simply inspiring. That’s where I take all my ideas, my projects and realize them in my think tank.

2. Who is your favourite artist and why?
For an art historian like me, this is of course the worst question of all, because I love art and adore many artists through the different epochs of art history. Among them are, for example, Titian, Cezanne, Picasso and Baselitz – and I’m already unhappy because I would have to name 30 more names.
I especially appreciate artists who have discovered something unprecedented in painting, who were ahead of their time and have shaped the next epoch.

3. Why is the encounter with art so important for children?
Because children are literally born artists. In my opinion, the great challenge for all parents is to protect and preserve this precious innate creativity of children as long as possible. Most of the time, sadly, this is lost with school…

4. What did you want to become as a child?
First a veterinarian and then a museum director. Noted: director!

5. What is special about your profession and what do you like best about it?
I am incredibly lucky to have been able to turn my passion and talent into my profession. I am free in the best sense, because creativity and artistic work is only possible with an open mind and free thoughts. And there we are again in my workshop .